“Mom, Grandpa Is Acting Funny. I’m scared!”

When dementia strikes an older family member, the effect on children can be overlooked, especially when the children knew “Grandma and Grandpa” in earlier, more “normal,” days. Discussing the situation may seem as scary to adults as the patient’s actions seem to grandchildren, but ignoring or covering up the matter is neither wise nor helpful.

Children look to adult family members for care and security, so they can be distrustful and confused when things change. An older child can be taught to treat Grandma’s mistakes with grace and enjoy Gramps’s company as much as possible, as long as communication remains open and the reasons for the change in personality are explained on their level. Otherwise, children may reach their own — often frightening — conclusions.

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"Smaller is Better": Covid-19 Primes Senior Living for Rise of Small-House Models

Small-house senior living may be well-suited to handle the disruptions of the Covid-19 era. This may help boost the model’s popularity going forward — but the industry will first need to overcome obstacles regarding the way these communities are developed, financed and licensed. Just ask Jim Stroud, co-founder and former chairman of Capital Senior Living (NYSE: CSU) and current president of Dallas-based holding company Stroud Companies. After leaving Capital at the end of 2008, Stroud set out to find the next generation of senior housing models. Click here to read the entire article!

Losing Sleep Over Losing Sleep?

During these unsettled and unsettling times, many of us are losing sleep over the ramifications of shutdowns, lockdowns, masks, social distancing, financial woes, empty supermarket shelves, disease, and whatever other worries we hear about or even manufacture ourselves.

Although the average person can lose sleep for various reasons, research has shown that Alzheimer’s patients have a greater tendency to experience altered sleep patterns that can keep them awake at night. It seems Alzheimer’s affects the brain in some unknown way.

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Memorial Day — A Day of Remembrance?

Memorial Day is an American holiday, observed on the last Monday of May, honoring the men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military. It has its roots in the days shortly after the Civil War, the war that cost more American lives than any war in history. Originally called "Decoration Day," “The 30th of May, 1868, is designated for the purpose of strewing with flowers, or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village and hamlet churchyard in the land" (May 5, 1868, General John A. Logan).

For many dementia and Alzheimer patients, this day may or may not mean anything. Survivors of World War II are few and are slipping away, as are their memories and the culture's memories of their sacrifice. Every generation has its warriors, and they deserve at least a moment's notice and recognition for their place in America’s history.

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How to Manage Mom's and Dad's Medications

Medications can be real lifesavers when taken in the proper doses and at the proper times. This is especially true for prescription medications meant to treat specific symptoms for specific individuals. However, they can turn on you if you take them in the wrong doses, at the wrong times, or don’t take them at all. This is a danger for older adults who may be taking multiple medications and may have memory issues.

If you find yourself or a loved one in a situation where medication schedules are confusing, it’s time to look into some products and services that can keep you on track. The keys to success are organization and reminders. Once you know what needs to be taken when and in what dose, the next step is to make sure you are reminded about those requirements.

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