Older Adults Are More Vulnerable in House Fires — Here's What To Do

(BPT) - Fire safety is important for all ages, but it’s especially crucial for seniors. The more advanced in years, the higher the risk related to fire safety and evacuation. This can be especially true for individuals with symptoms of Alzheimer's and other dementia.

Older adults are at increased risk from home fire injury — by age 65, they are at 2.5 times the risk, and by 85, at 4 times the risk as compared to the population at large.

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5 Tips for Supporting Brain Health

(BPT) - As you get older, you might take steps to develop healthy habits, whether exercising, eating healthier, or limiting your consumption of alcohol. But did you know that there are steps you can take to help with your brain health? Such preventive measures might even reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s — and the good news is, you might be doing these things anyway, like working on puzzles or trying to get a good night’s sleep.

Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia. In fact, someone in the United States develops the disease every 65 seconds, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. More than 6 million Americans currently live with Alzheimer’s — a number now projected to reach 7.2 million by 2025.

Along with learning more about the disease, these five simple steps could possibly improve brain health, reduce the risk of disease, and help delay the potential onset of Alzheimer’s or dementia.

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The Intersection Between Loneliness and Social Isolation

(BPT) - These past couple of years have been challenging in lots of ways and many people, particularly older adults, have felt the weight and impact of loneliness and social isolation.

This has been especially true when staying home and sheltering in place has been recommended to increase safety. With less contact with others, it may be difficult for older adults to maintain the relationships that are so important to mental, as well as physical, well-being. In fact, loneliness has been found to lead to health risks, such as:

11 Myths About Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease is a leading cause of death in the United States, and millions of Americans are affected by the disease. It’s important to distinguish the facts from the myths about Alzheimer’s, especially when it comes to finding information online. Read on to learn about common myths surrounding this disease.

1. Alzheimer’s disease and dementia are the same thing

Share this infographic and help spread the word about understanding different types of dementia.

People often use the terms Alzheimer’s disease and dementia interchangeably, but there is a difference. Dementia refers to impaired memory, thinking, reasoning, and behavior, and Alzheimer’s is just one type of dementia. The terms are likely confused because Alzheimer’s is the most common cause of dementia and the most well-known. But there are other types of dementia, too, including Lewy body dementia, frontotemporal dementia, and vascular dementia.

Learn more about dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

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The Truth About Aging and Dementia

As we age, our brains change, but Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias are not an inevitable part of aging. In fact, up to 40% of dementia cases may be prevented or delayed. It helps to understand what’s normal and what’s not when it comes to brain health.

Normal brain aging may mean slower processing speeds and more trouble multitasking, but routine memory, skills, and knowledge are stable and may even improve with age. It’s normal to occasionally forget recent events such as where you put your keys or the name of the person you just met.

 

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